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Polar Krush eliminates plastic straws from its brand
12 April, 2019

Iced drinks company Polar Krush, has eliminated plastic straws from its brand with the launch of a “100% environmentally friendly” spoon straw.

Polar Krush has developed a spoon straw made from paper to replace the hundreds of millions of traditional polypropylene straws distributed each year by the food, drinks and leisure industries.

The new paper straw features a spoon-like scoop at one end, using three layers of paper bonded together for superior strength and durability.

The spoon enables customers to scoop and eat their iced drinks, while the wide diameter of the straw makes the ice crystals even easier to enjoy.

Michael Reid, sales director of Polar Krush, said: “You only have to switch on the television or open a newspaper to read about the concerning situation the planet finds itself in due to the high level of plastics clogging up our waterways and finding their way to landfill. At Polar Krush, our customers are predominantly families with children and as a company we care about protecting the world they are inheriting.

“We have already introduced initiatives to remove single use plastics from our brand. We have changed our packaging and in addition to all our cups being recyclable and containing recyclable material, we also provide reusable and vegetable-based alternatives.”


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Weekly retail fuel prices: 4 November 2019
RegionDieselLPGSuper ULUL
East130.9367.90138.13126.75
East Midlands130.73139.73126.64
London130.73139.60127.04
North East129.5562.90137.10125.31
North West129.9963.90138.40126.48
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West Midlands130.4059.90137.63126.57
Yorkshire & Humber130.02139.47126.29

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