Forecourt Trader - 30 years at the heart of the fuel retailing community

Crime costs forecourt operators £25.7m

02 May, 2013
Page 4 

Crime on Britain's forecourts cost fuel retailers £25.7m in 2012, up from £22.2m in 2010, according to figures revealed in the annual forecourt crime survey carried out by BOSS, the British Oil Security Syndicate.

Drive-off incidents were responsible for the majority of losses, estimated at £20.4m up 31% compared with £15.5m in 2010 with a further £4.2m lost from motorists claiming to have no means of payment (NMoP) who fail to return to clear their debt.

The combined drive-off and NMoP loss for the average UK service station in 2012 was £2,860, up 28% compared with 2010, partly as a result of fuel prices rising 17.4% in the same period.

BOSS said losses have been shown to fall by up to 55% where it has established Forecourt Watch schemes, and its Payment Watch scheme has helped retailers recover more than 80% of their financial losses from NMoP incidents, with the debt collection element recovering more than £500,000 of NMoP losses.

The survey results also showed that in the past two years robbery losses, including attacks on contractors collecting cash or re-stocking cash machines, dropped substantially from £1.43m to £0.67m with burglary losses also falling from £0.72m to £0.48m.





  • Weekly
    Retail
  • Weekly
    wholesale
  • Daily
    Average
Weekly retail fuel prices: 2 September 2019
RegionDieselLPGSuper ULUL
East132.3563.90140.80128.93
East Midlands132.1271.23141.73128.82
London131.70142.12129.26
North East130.66140.60128.17
North West131.39140.18128.47
Northern Ireland129.03134.10126.35
Scotland131.70139.60128.79
South East132.7358.90141.28129.68
South West131.9563.90140.12128.70
Wales130.9855.70137.19127.82
West Midlands131.6066.90140.32129.05
Yorkshire & Humber131.2384.90140.57128.52

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